Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

A-level English - The Gothic Novel: Conventions

A guide to resources on the Gothic novel; the origins, indicators, authors and books, compiled by your librarians.

Slideshow on Gothic Conventions

Websites

Gothic Possibilities - Journal article

GOTHIC POSSIBILITIES
The authors Norman Holland and Leona Sherman look for answers to questions like - How has a genre like Gothic maintained its popularity for two centuries? Why are the overwhelming majority of those who read gothics women?

New Literary History, Vol. 8, No. 2,

Gothic vs Romantic - Journal article

GOTHIC VERSUS  ROMANTIC:  A  REVALUATION OF  THE  GOTHIC  NOVEL
BY ROBERT  D. HUME
The Gothic novel has not fared well among literary critics, even in this age of sympathetic evaluations of largely forgotten minor works..
 PMLA, Vol. 84, No. 2

Love/Slave - Journal article

LOVE / SLAVE:  by Judith Wilt
The author writes that the essence of the "Gothic" is intimacy...
 Victorian Studies, Vol. 37, No. 3

Introduction - Motifs and Conventions of 'Gothic'

A Motif is a repeated theme, image or literary device

A Convention is a widely used and accepted device or technique as in a particular fiction genre

Gothic Conventions in the books

Capturing the castle - Journal article

CAPTURING THE CASTLE
Castles in the air, castles built on sand: Pete Bunten examines the Gothic castle as myth, motif and metaphor and looks at the ways in which this may reflect the instability of the genre.
The English Review, February 2010

The Radcliffean Gothic Model - Journal article

THE RADCLIFFEAN GOTHIC MODEL: A Form for Feminine Sexuality:  by Cynthia Griffin Wolff
During the eighteenth  century, a period  of  the most lively  investigation  into  the  possibilities  of  that  "new" genre,  the  English  novel,
several models  were  developed  which  proved  so successful  that they have  persisted  even  into  the present.
  Modern Language Studies, Vol. 9, No. 3,